Drom Store & Dutch Colony Coffee // Nikon Df Part 1

local creatives, photography
When the opportunity to try out the Nikon Df for my blog surfaced, I was lucky enough to be selected and learn more about photography with the Df. With a 16.2 megapixel full frame CMOS sensor with impressive low-light capabilities, retro appearance, digital effects, and even retouch options available, the Nikon Df is simply a joy to work with. Here’s where I went with it.
The day started with an impromptu visit to The Little Drom Store (recently moved to SOTA), followed by the Dutch Colony Coffee Co. I love how the pictures turned out without any editing. Initially the handling of the camera came rather hard for me as I had always been using compact cameras.
*Click on images to get full view resolution*

DSC_1569 cropped
DSC_1579
With the press-and-rotate dials, I wasn’t confident that I would be able to get a good shot at the given moment. But to my own surprise, I was pretty accustomed to the dials after some shots and the good weight of the camera allowed me to stabilise my grip when clicking the shutter (just that you know, I do have fat fingers). Once you get the hang of it, the dials and buttons are a great help giving you full view of the settings at one glance.
Apart from my big love of interiors, I also love good coffee. So I thought it was best to try out this beautiful camera at a cafe. I decided to pay a visit with the Df to Dutch Colony Coffee Co’s new branch at Frankel Avenue. I ordered my usual twos: flat white and chai latte. From the many cafes I’ve been to, Dutch Colony is one of the few places that serves good chai latte (with right proportions of spice and milk to my liking). I wanted to create images with warm ambient in daylight so I chose outdoor seats with the warm glowing incandescent lights.
DSC_1601 warmWent for a dark moody ambient in daylight. It was really fun creating images manually
so you can achieve the photographs that eventually determines your style. ISO 1600, 50mm, 1 EV, f/4, 1/125s
The Df excels greatly in this low light, moody ambient I wanted to create in daylight. Details for highlights and shadows are well achieved even at ISO 1600 and it’s low in noise. The results are delightful. With a few adjustments, I was able to get different moods with the same given light source, allowing me to better determine what kind of style/exposure I would love to have.
I usually find people portraits harder to manipulate, especially in low light situations. In this scene, I was able to get the desired results after a few quick adjustments on the dials. With Df’s lightweight body compared to other digital SLRs of same class, I must say I could move easily for shots involving people.
DSC_1666 BWISO 800, 35mm, 1 EV, f/2.8, 1/125s
DSC_1642Played with higher ISO and longer aperture here. ISO 1600, 24mm, 1 EV, f/2.8, 1/30s

DSC_1646I applied the black & white filter available from the camera retouch menu for this image.
ISO 800, 24mm, 1 EV, f/2.8, 1/30s
———————-
I love how my barista portrait turned out, with the right highlights, but not losing details on the shadows – this mood is the photography style I sought after. I love to work with the manual mode, the light and colour results just surprise me in different situations. And that is the beauty of handcrafted images.
In an upcoming post, I get invited to the cozy apartment of Laura Phay – of interior design studio She Designs He Builds. She is also the creative brain and co-owner of lauded cafes Ronin and The Plain (both run by her husband).
// This post is sponsored by Nikon //
Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Drom Store & Dutch Colony Coffee // Nikon Df Part 1

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s